Why Do Parents Keep Searching for Kids' Credit Cards When There Is No Such Thing?

Why Do Parents Keep Searching for Kids' Credit Cards When There Is No Such Thing?

Most parents aim to give their kids the best financial future they can. A good credit score and good money habits come to mind when we think about finances. While kids and teens under 18 can’t get their own credit card, there are several strategies you can use to build credit early and teach good money habits. 

 

Kids credit card or kids debit card? 

What’s the difference between a credit card and a debit card for kids? First of all, children can’t get a credit card on their own. Parents can add kids to their credit cards, but it may not give your kid the same sense of accountability or build the same habits as spending their own money. 

 

However, debit cards for kids can give them a sense of earning and spending their own money. They also create a great way to teach kids how money works. While debit cards don’t build credit, they can help kids build good habits before they get access to spend borrowed money.

How to teach kids about credit

Another reason parents are interested in kids credit cards is to help them understand how credit works. While credit is an important part of finances, remind your kids that credit isn’t “magic money.” A key idea you can teach is the difference between money you own and money you are responsible for paying back. 

Start with a kids’ debit card 

Debit cards teach kids to manage their own money first before buying things with borrowed funds later in life. Start with a kids’ debit card, so your child can practice good spending and saving habits regularly. Cards are also the safest alternative to carrying cash, especially for younger kids. 

 

 

With GoHenry’s debit card for kids, you get the safety and convenience of a card combined with a financial education app that teaches your kids through Money Missions

 

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Written by Kristin Yarbrough Published Apr 10, 2022 ● 2 min. read