20 Great Ways to Make Money at 14 Years Old [Ultimate Guide]

20 Great Ways to Make Money at 14 Years Old [Ultimate Guide]

Many 14 year-olds are keen to get a job, but government restrictions can make it tricky. Nevertheless, it’s worth the effort to find one, as part-time work will help teens make money, and gain skills that will advance their career and financial know-how.

 

Some of our top ways to make money at 14 years old include:

  1. Babysit

  2. Help out at home

  3. Start a blog

  4. Wash cars

  5. Sell old clothing online

  6. Freelance writing

  7. Tutoring

  8. Make and sell things

  9. Create digital art

  10. Start their own business

 Can kids get a job at 14?

Is your teen eager to get a job and earn some money of their own? If so, they’re not alone. According to our latest Youth Economy Report 2022, 40% of young people have a part-time job. And more than seven in ten say earning their own money is important. 

 

Kids can get a part-time job from the age of 14 in the states. Although there are restrictions over hours and the kind of work they’re permitted to do. 

 

In a nutshell, children aged 14 are not allowed to work:

  • During school hours

  • Before 7 am or after 7 pm on any day, except from June 1 through Labor Day, when night-time work hours are extended to 9 pm.

  • In any job that may harm their health, well-being, or education

  • More than 3 hours on a school day including Friday

  • More than 18 hours per week when school is in session

  • More than 8 hours a day when school is not in session (or more than 40 hours per week). More than 25 hours per week during holidays.

 

Jobs 14 or 15 year olds are allowed to work at include:

  • Most retail jobs

  • Intellectual or creative work (like tutoring, acting, video editing and web design)

  • Delivery jobs by foot, bicycle or public transportation

  • Clean-up and yard work not involving power tools, mowers etc

  • Car washing and petrol pump attendant

  • Food preparation and dishwashing.

 

Each state also has its own laws when it comes to the employment of 14 year olds.  If state law and federal law overlap, whichever one protects the minor more will apply. 

 

You’ll find a handy chart on the youth labor laws in your state on the Department of Labor’s Youth Rules website.

 

There is also no minimum wage for under 16s. So be sure to talk to your child about what constitutes a fair wage for the work they do.

What jobs can 14-year-olds get?

Help out at home

As it can be so challenging for 14-year-olds to find a job, you can help them with motivation and dedication by talking to them about earning money from home. While there are chores you might expect them to do as part of family life, there will be others you could allocate to them for paid work. For instance, cleaning windows, taking items to the thrift store for you, or helping younger siblings with homework. 

 

If your child has a GoHenry card, add these paid tasks and the frequency to the app. When your child completes the task, money will be added to their weekly allowance.

Babysit

Babysitting is a traditional coming-of-age job that teaches responsibility, business know-how (generating work and setting fees) and money management.

Start a blog

Blogging is a great way to make extra money, especially if your child has a topic they’re passionate about. However, it takes lots of motivation and hard work to make money from sponsored posts and affiliate links.

Wash cars

Washing cars is another rite of passage job and teaches kids about price setting, marketing and finding their niche in a competitive marketplace.

Pet sitting

If your child is good with animals, they could offer pet-sitting services for a few hours during the week and at weekends.

Tutoring

Does your child excel in certain subjects? Could they help younger children with homework and reading? If so, tutoring may be a job for them.

Create and sell art

There's a vast market for selling digital art in local markets and online marketplaces like Etsy.

Offer up gardening help

Your child may not know how to redesign a garden but weeding, planting and mowing the lawn are all in demand.

Start a business 

Brainstorm kids' small business ideas with your child that they could easily set up and work at alone. Could they sell home-baked cookies? Make wreaths and decorations during the holiday season? Are they tech-savvy? If so, freelance video editing or web design pay well. 

How can a 14-year-old make money online?

YouTuber Vlogger

Becoming an established YouTuber takes work. Behind every vlogger is a long process of hard work and investment (before they even make money). If your fourteen-year-old is willing to put in the effort, it's worth a go.

Do online paid-surveys

Your child can sign up to fill in online paid surveys as long as they are 14. However, as the parent, you must consent when they sign up.

Social media influencer

According to our Youth Economy report, 29% of kids are already making money as social media influencers. Suggest they give it a try on TikTok.

Virtual assistant

Teens can learn a lot about the corporate world by being virtual assistants. VAs answer and send emails, schedule appointments, format presentations, and perform various administrative tasks.

Gaming

Online gaming is one of the most popular ways kids are earning money. 41% are spending around 8 hours a month doing it.  

Sell stock photos online

Is your kid great at taking photos on their phone? If so, they could sell photos to stock agencies online or offer photography services for family and pet photos.

Sell old clothing online

A third of teens (34%) are now earning from selling things on online marketplaces like Etsy, eBay, Depop and Vinted. Skills learned here include marketing and price setting.

Sell custom products online

If your teen is creative, they can create, market, and sell customized products from t-shirts to totes and make-up bags online.

Sell old toys online

Does your teen have unwanted toys? Think LEGOs, Beanie babies, Barbie dolls or My Little Pony. If so, they could make extra money selling their old toys online.

Graphic designer

A good option for creative teens with some knowledge of software like Adobe Illustrator or Canva is to create anything from logos to business cards and infographics and sell them online.

More ways to make money at 14

Earn money from your money

It’s not always easy to delay gratification, once you feel the thrill of being paid. Yet, saving is a win-win scenario if your 14-year-old wants to make money.

 

Explain to teens that when we put our saved money to work, it can grow and earn more for the future; this is called investing. Then thanks to compound interest, putting money in a savings account also helps you to make interest. That’s interest on the money you save and the interest you earn.

Teach them not to be afraid to try 

Our Youth Economy Report 2022, shows the entrepreneurial attitude of Generation Z is alive and kicking. A quarter of young people plan to be their own boss in the future. It's why it pays to encourage them to find a part-time job or work for themselves so they learn lessons about resilience, motivation, and commitment.

What to do with the money they make

Set up an emergency fund

Help your child understand that everyone needs an emergency fund for those expenses that come out of the blue. You may be their financial safety net, but in adulthood, rent, bills, and lost phones will become their responsibility.

Save for something they want

What does your teen want? Give them ideas beyond the usual clothes and devices. They could save towards a day out, a special concert or something for their room they thought was beyond their reach. Show them how quickly savings stack up and grow by making them automatically put away a part of their earnings.

Save for later life

Get paid, save, and budget. Teens can learn how to prepare for a healthier financial life as an adult with a  GoHenry prepaid debit card. It's the perfect way for them to get paid, learn to budget and keep their money in saving pots. Whether they’re saving for driving lessons, college or a longer-term goal.

 

 

 

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Written by Anita Naik Published Feb 7, 2023 ● 8 min. read